Miriam the Prophetess as Guardian and Healer by Jill Hammer

As I read this blog it reminds me of other stories along similar paths, the healing with water and salt, very cleansing. The herbs that are used. Often this is also the way of a shaman. The priestess is following the way of the Woman’s Mysteries. I don’t think that religions differ that much under the one heaven we all live. The Creator… Is. Does it matter the path we take to arrive? only if it harms another.

jill hammer cropped

The biblical traditions of Miriam the prophetess have captured the imaginations of Bible-readers throughout the ages.  Miriam, Moses’ sister, watches over Moses in his cradle (Exodus 2), and leads the Hebrew women in dance at the shore of the Sea of Reeds to celebrate redemption  (Exodus 15).  Rabbinic lore identifies Miriam with Puah, the midwife who saved Hebrew babies from Pharaoh, and depicts her as the herald of Moses’ birth (Exodus Rabbah 1:13; Babylonian Talmud, Sotah 12a). Contemporary Jewish feminists have established traditions of singing to Miriam the prophetess on Saturday night, parallel to the tradition of singing to Elijah the prophet at that time.   It has also become popular among some feminist/egalitarian Jews to place a cup of Miriam on the seder table at the time of Passover.  This cup is usually filled with water in order to recall the ancient legend that a well of water followed Miriam…

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